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Edward A. Johnson. A School History ... of the Negro Race in the United States. With a Short Introduction as to the Origin of the Race. Also a Short Sketch of Liberia. Raleigh: Edwards & Broughton, 1894.

Edward A. Johnson. A School History ... of the Negro Race in the United States. With a Short Introduction as to the Origin of the Race. Also a Short Sketch of Liberia. Raleigh: Edwards & Broughton, 1894.
Edward A. Johnson. A School History ... of the Negro Race in the United States. With a Short Introduction as to the Origin of the Race. Also a Short Sketch of Liberia. Raleigh: Edwards & Broughton, 1894.
Edward A. Johnson. A School History ... of the Negro Race in the United States. With a Short Introduction as to the Origin of the Race. Also a Short Sketch of Liberia. Raleigh: Edwards & Broughton, 1894.

Item Information

Title

Edward A. Johnson. A School History ... of the Negro Race in the United States. With a Short Introduction as to the Origin of the Race. Also a Short Sketch of Liberia. Raleigh: Edwards & Broughton, 1894.

Rights

In the public domain and may be used without copyright restriction.

Identifier

https://exhibits.lib.unc.edu/exhibits/show/enriching_voices/item/6897

Text

A SCHOOL HISTORY
(FOURTH READER GRADE)
OF THE
NEGRO RACE IN THE UNITED STATES.
WITH A SHORT INTRODUCTION
AS TO
THE ORIGIN OF THE RACE.
ALSO A
SHORT SKETCH OF LIBERIA.
BY
EDWARD A. JOHNSON, LL.B.,
Former Principal of the Washington School, Raleigh N. C.
and
W. B. KENDRICK,
Raleigh, N. C.

RALEIGH, N. C.
EDWARDS & BROUGHTON, PUBLISHERS.
1894

PREFACE.

To the many thousand colored teachers in our country this book is dedicated. During my experience of eleven years as a teacher I have often felt that the children of the Negro race ought to study some work that would give them information on the many brave deeds and noble characters of their own race. In this particular our school histories are generally deficient. It must, indeed, be a stimulus to any people to be able to refer to their ancestors as distinguished in deeds of valor, and peculiarly so to the colored people. Patriotism and valor under such circumstances as those under which they lived possess a peculiar merit and beauty. Though a slave, the Negro shed his blood in the defence of the government in those days when a foreign foe threatened its destruction. In each of the American wars the Negro was faithful, yes, faithful to a land not his own in point of rights and freedom.

May I not hope that the study of this little work by the boys and girls of the race will inspire in them a new self-respect and confidence? Much, of

PREFACE
course, will depend on you, dear teachers, into whose bands I hope to place this book. By your efforts, and those of the children, you are to teach from the truth of history that complexions do not govern patriotism, valor, and sterling integrity.

My endeavor has been to shorten this work as much as I thought consistent with clearness. Personal opinions and comments have been kept out. A fair impartial statement has been my aim. Facts are what I have tried to give, without bias or prejudice; and may not something herein said hasten on that day when the race for which these facts are written, following the example of the noble men and women who have gone before, shall raise themselves to the highest pinnacle of all that is noble in human nature?

I respectfully request that my fellow-teachers will see to it that the word Negro is written with a capital N. It deserves to be so enlarged, and will help, perhaps, to magnify the race it stands for in the minds of those who see it.

E. A. J.