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The Gastonia Gazette Tuesday October 12, 1920

The Gastonia Gazette Tuesday October 12, 1920

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Title

The Gastonia Gazette Tuesday October 12, 1920

Source

The Gastonia Gazette Tuesday October 12, 1920.. North Carolina Collection, Wilson Special Collections Library, UNC-CH

Rights

In the public domain and may be used without copyright restriction.

Type

still image

Identifier

https://exhibits.lib.unc.edu/items/show/6469

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

Advises Negro Women to Stay Out.

Raleigh Times.

President James B. Dudley of the Agricultural and Technical College at Greensboro writes an open letter advising negro women not to attempt to register and vote in the coming election. He says that it is no expedient and that it is unnecessary. The paragraph devoted to the exposition of its inexpediency we reproduce:

“An author of wisdom and renown has declared, and the world has accepted, that all things that are lawful are not expedient. For over half a century the negro question has been the bane of political discussions. Questions of imperial moment have been shoved aside or discussed in the shadow of this race questions, which is so pregnant with prejudice, hatred and strife. The progress of our State has been retarded and will always be hampered until we can give calm dispassionate thought and discussion to all public questions of great moment unfettered by prejudice, hatred and violence. We are happily and rapidly moving in that direction. Your entrance now in the political field will add fresh fuel to the fires of race prejudice and political hate, and postpone the day of calm thought, dispassionate discussion and of political freedom and independence. Prejudice is losing its grip on the throne and intelligence is ascending. Why prolong the struggle?”

Dudley can usually be counted on to furnish advice to his race which if followed will avert trouble. He belongs to that growing number of educated negroes who have come to see that no matter what may be in the Constitution or the statute law, nothing is to be gained by the attempt to an inferior to coerce a superior race.

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