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Refugees

The Revolution produced a refugee crisis in Europe as approximately two million people fled from the Civil War, Red Terror and Bolshevik rule. Refugees settled in nearly all European countries, including the newly independent Czechoslovakia, Poland, Finland, and the Baltic States, as well as in the Middle East, North Africa, China, and as far as the Americas and Australia. Though initially lacking citizenship and rights, they nevertheless established their own communities, businesses and cultural organizations. Following Soviet amnesty, many returned, only to perish in Stalin's purges.

- Burnakin, Anatolii (?–1932), editor
- Зарубежный клич
   Call to Arms from Abroad
- Sofia: M. Bogdanov, [1921]

Produced by journalists evacuated from Crimea after General Wrangel’s defeat and aimed at new Russian communities in Bulgaria and Turkey, this early refugee publication is full of fervent readiness to return to Russia to fight Bolshevism. It consists of impassioned appeals for refugee unity in the anti-Bolshevik struggle and the preservation of the exile Russian Army, accounts of refugee life in Turkey, and patriotic poems. The cover depicts Saint George riding from Constantinople to slay the dragon that has taken over the Kremlin.

Доклад Главному управлению Российского общества Красного креста председателя Комитета Р.О.К.К. на Ближнем Востоке <br /> A Report to the General Administration of the Russian Society of the Red Cross by Senator G.V. Glinka, Chairman of its Middle Eastern Branch, on the State of Affairs Towards the End of 1921

Read Senator Glinka's 1921 Red Cross Report

 - Glinka, Grigorii (1862–1934)
 - Доклад Главному управлению Российского общества Красного креста председателя Комитета Р.О.К.К. на Ближнем Востоке сенатора Г.В. Глинки о положении дел к концу 1921 года
 - Report to the General Administration of the Russian Society of the Red Cross by Senator G.V. Glinka, Chairman of its Middle Eastern Branch, on the State of Affairs Towards the End of 1921
 - Constantinople: Tip. L. Babok i synov'ia, 1921.

This report summarizes Red Cross efforts to provide food, shelter, medical aid, education and employment to 35,000 women, children, and elderly Russian refugees in Constantinople and environs, as well as to ailing refugees in Serbia, Bulgaria, and Greece. 

  -  Belov, Vadim (1890-193?)
  -  Белое похмелье
     The White Hangover
  -  Moscow: Gos. izd-vo, 1923

Vadim Belov emigrated to Estonia in 1920, but was expelled to Soviet Russia in 1922 for pro-Bolshevik journalistic activity. His account of the worldview, social conditions, and aspirations of Russian refugees paints a pitiful picture of émigré life for Soviet readers. At the heart of Belov's exposé is the question of the refugees' reconciliation with the Soviet government and return to Russia. Belov's publication was part of a major repatriation campaign following an amnesty issued by the Soviets. However, many of those who returned were persecuted during Stalin's purges.