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Galifianakis for U.S. Senate

Democrat Nick Galifianakis ran against North Carolina Senator Jesse Helms in 1972. During that campaign Galifianakis made light of his long "non-Anglo" sounding name by dividing it and putting it on two buttons. The buttons responded to the slogan "Jesse Helms: He's one of us".

 

give'em Helms President Helms '84: Right From the Start

Even though three presidents have been born in North Carolina (Polk, Jackson, and Johnson) perhaps the most nationally recognized North Carolina politician in recent years has been former senator Jesse Helms. His voting record and public statements during five terms in the US Senate (1973-2003) generated large amounts of both praise and criticism. Helms was the first Republican from North Carolina to be elected to the Senate in the twentieth century. At one time a Democrat, the former radio and television editorialist changed his party affiliation in 1972 to run against incumbent Nick Galifianikis. From 1995-2001 he served as Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Over the last three decades, political buttons have both promoted Helms's successful campaigns and criticized his position on controversial topics such as abortion.

This 1984 button was produced as a joke, as Helms never sought the presidency. Helms was a strong supporter of fellow Republican Ronald Reagan, president from 1981 to 1989. "Right from the Start" is a play on Helms's strong conservative or "right wing" opinions.

Gantt for U.S. Senate: I'm Helping North Carolina Beat Jesse Helms New South Harvey Gantt New Senator

Architect Harvey Gantt was the first AfricanAmerican elected mayor of Charlotte, North Carolina. A native of Charleston, South Carolina, Gantt was the first black student to enter Clemson University. Gantt, a Democrat, made two unsuccessful attempts to unseat Republican Senator Jesse Helms; once in 1990, and again in 1996. The 1990 campaign was widely viewed as one in which race was a significant factor. Helms, was known for his opposition to affirmative action, and Gantt sought to become the state's first black senator to Congress since Reconstruction.

Although often used by historians simply to designate the post-Reconstruction period, the term "New South" defines the late nineteenth-century program of regional industrialization and agricultural diversification. As can be seen on this button, the term continues to be used today.

Pro-Choice & Anti-Helms Helms, November 5, 1996

Even though three presidents have been born in North Carolina (Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, and Andrew Johnson) arguably the most nationally recognized North Carolina politician is former U.S. senator Jesse Helms. His voting record and public statements during five terms in Congress (1973-2003) generated large amounts of both praise and criticism. Helms was the first Republican from North Carolina to be elected to the Senate in the twentieth century. Originally a Democrat, the former radio talk show host and television commentator changed his party affiliation in 1972 to run against Nick Galifianikis. From 1995-2001 Helms served as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Over the last three decades, political buttons have both promoted Helms's successful campaigns and criticized his position on controversial topics such as abortion.